Skip to main content

About your Search

20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
card when it comes to the education your kids may be getting here in the united states. when you see how poorly american students do compared to the rest of the world in a new test, you might have tough questions for educators. >>> new details in the "fast and furious crash" the car in question, 600 horses, incredibly quick reflexes and potentially deadly if pushed too far. la's known definitely for its traffic, congestion, for the smog. but there are a lot of people that do ride the bus. and now that the buses are running on natural gas, they don't throw out as much pollution into the air. so i feel good. i feel like i'm doing my part to help out the environment. it's lots of things. all waking up. connecting to the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. we're going to wake the world up. and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. yeah... try new alka seltzer fruit chews. they work fast on heartburn and taste awesome. these are good. told ya! i'm
hash tag "ac 360." >>> next, grim report card when it comes to the education your kids may be getting here in the united states. when you see how poorly american students do compared to the rest of the world in a new test, you might have tough questions for educators. >>> new details in the "fast and furious crash" the car in question, 600 horses, incredibly quick reflexes and potentially deadly if pushed too far. people don't have to think about where their electricity comes from. they flip the switch-- and the light comes on. it's our job to make sure that it does. using natural gas this power plant can produce enough energy for about 600,000 homes. generating electricity that's cleaner and reliable, with fewer emissions-- it matters. ♪ is what makes us different. we take the time to get to know you and your unique health needs. then we help create a personalized healthcare experience that works for you. and you. and you. with 50 years of know-how, and a dedicated network of doctors, health coaches, and wellness experts, we're a partner you can rely on -- today, and tomorrow. we'r
day of school as was very common under the british education system there. his real name is rolala. >> he went to a methodist school and everyone was given english names -- >> which means -- >> which means it's the branch of a tree -- shaking the branch of a tree but the meaning is troublemaker. >> i love that. >> it's so -- >> that was his birth name, troublemaker was extraordinary. >> when i started working with him, i never, ever heard anyone call him nelson. at the same time, he wasn't president yet. i heard people use his clan name modiba. it shows his background and it's paternal and just stuck. so that's -- everybody called him modiba. >> the courage it took in the 50s, the '60s, this regime that attempted to have absolute control. it's hard i think for anybody who didn't live through those times to understand what this took to oppose and ultimately over throw this regime. >> i didn't live it either. the list of not indignities but the appalling facts of separate life were just -- you cannot believe this happened. i mean, you saw it all, whites and blacks -- >> tremendous, t
-old university student said had mandela had not made those choices he would not be getting the education he is getting. so many people calling and commenting on how if mandela had not been the man that he was, this country could have very easily ended up like syria or iraq. another policeman we were speaking to this morning saying with nelson mandela's passing he felt he had lost a part of his soul and a part of his body and that he truly hopes moving forward the country and its leaders will remember what it was that this incredible man stood for. john? >> it is so remarkable. arwa damon, thank you. she brings up such a good point. words like legend don't begin to cut when twhen you deal with nelson mandela. when you're in south africa he is more than a leader and more than a legend. he's in the fabric of that nation and some one's sole they carry a piece of him around. >> a very interesting point given what we know is going on in the middle east now the connection she made the country could have ended you up differently if it wasn't for his sacrifices. >> no way inevitable there would not
access to education. he could have stayed in his community, but he saw -- he started to see himself as an african, not just as a hossa. he started to see himself and how the white regime was dividing people by stressing ethnic differences and he was able to overcome that. and i think that's such an extraordinary thing. >> it's true. it's true. he was a courageous human being, and full of the idea that he was on a journey and he had something to do. he had a place to be, and it's fabulous to realize that there is an old spirit, an old song which is -- ♪ i'm on my journey now mount zion and i wouldn't take nothing, mount zion ♪ he was on a journey and he knew it, and he had something to do, and this is what each of us has. if we have enough courage, we can say i'm on a journey. i have a charge to keep. >> you were living in cairo with your husband, a south african freedom fighter when you first met nelson mandela. you said your husband and mandela were rivals but that didn't matter. tell us about that experience. >> their were rivals but when nelson mandela came to visit, he never
for a long time. >> the fact that you and other young people received the education, maybe they had it in school and know about safe sex, they're still getting infected. how do you overcome that and stop it? >> well, that is the challenge, because they think nothing can happen to them. at the end of our day in our community we have to start accepting those who are gay in our family. it is like my son, e. j. came out. it is important that cookie and i support our son, we're going to support him 100%. but we're in the minorities in this. in the black community, young gay men or young ladies who are lesbian, they're afraid to tell their parents. >> you mentioned your son. and you have been incredibly supportive of your son when it was publicly known he was gay, you just made a really moving statement of support with you and your wife. in terms of parents having the conversation about hiv/aids with their kids, is that a conversation that you and your wife had your sons early on? >> yes, that is what happened, i had to tell them early on how i got hiv. if they're going to have sex later
was one of the lucky few to get a formal education. it was also among these hills the young man experienced african democracy first hand. he listened to council chiefs and elders debating issues for hours until they reached consensus on an issue. the traditional leader says this vital lesson influenced mandela years later as president when he helped shape south africa's modern democracy and reconciled blacks and whites. >> he has struggled both with the african and the balancing act that has been worked upon through mandela's leadership to insure that it ends in a peaceful and free country. >> reporter: in his 20s, mandela left rural life for johannesburg where he studied law and soon rose to political prominence but he was always proud of his heritage and he appeared in court wearing traditional robes at the trial in 1964. it was a healing moment when his father's chieftanship was returned to the family in 2007 and handed to mandela's grandson mandola. he says family and planned history is pivotal to his grntd father's identity. >> we would like to tell the story of the mandela
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)